Author Topic: How to monitor changes applied by System Mechanic?  (Read 8608 times)

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Offline madhouserevival

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How to monitor changes applied by System Mechanic?
« on: May 27, 2014, 04:33:32 pm »
I would like to be able to monitor, track and later review exactly what changes take place when System Mechanic (or any other program) applies certain fixes. Is there a program that can do that for me?

The problem:

In many cases it doesn't tell you why something is a wrong. Example: Just now it told me "Your computer has 247 core data conflicts within the Windows communication infrastructure" and "Your Internet configuration is not optimized for maximum speed." In the past I've run the repair on the "core data conflicts" which resulted in a massive improvement in Windows 8's responsiveness (currently, I'm seeing slow disk transfer speeds when copying files even when using Teracopy, so am inclined to apply the "fix"), but I am still a little perturbed that none of these "conflicts" are detailed., hence the reason I want a way  to track what happens.

Thanks.

Offline Shane

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Re: How to monitor changes applied by System Mechanic?
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2014, 12:44:20 pm »
No clue, I never used that program.

One way I like to see changes that a program does is I can use sysinternals process monitor and see everything a program does, another way is to use a tool that takes a reg snap shot and then after the changes it can do another snap shot and then tell you the differences between the two.

Thats my way of doing it and it isnt that easy lol

Shane

Offline madhouserevival

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Re: How to monitor changes applied by System Mechanic?
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2014, 12:46:30 pm »
Recommend a program for the second option? Thanks.

Offline Shane

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Re: How to monitor changes applied by System Mechanic?
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2014, 12:48:18 pm »

Offline beep

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Re: How to monitor changes applied by System Mechanic?
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2014, 12:11:38 pm »
I've used System Mechanic (and others like it) and have found that even the so-called 'pro' versions are more or less useless and in the case of 'memory optimization' worse than useless. The cache files that they will clean out are probably actually useful. Me, I have my C: drive on a very tight leash and sometimes can use all the space I can get. But Ccleaner (which has been around since before forever; the first 'C' in the name once stood for 'crap' which should give you an idea of its age) will hose you out quite nicely. Do check into its ability to remove old restore points (which Windows just adores creating for little to no reason should you, say, blink or fart). If you want a defragger that also optimizes, go for Defraggler which is awesome. Me, I'm just a wannabe geek who's been around for some time.

Offline madhouserevival

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Re: How to monitor changes applied by System Mechanic?
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2014, 01:04:36 pm »
Defraggler runs for 8 or more hours MOST of the times I've tried it over the last couple of years.  I'm not the only person to report that issue. I prefer Autlogigistic'ss defrag program  though I just use Windows to trim my ssds. I only use system mechanic for a one time optimization. There is something that takes place in the "core conflicts" repair that greatly improves the responsiveness in my Windows 8 machines. Once that's done, I usually just uninstall it. :)

Anywho, that regshot seems really for people who are far more technical than I. The list it produced was really big and there  was no practical way for me to see what each registry entry does. Anyway, I chose to switch to a local account on my Windows 8.1 Pro machine and it's twice as responsive now.